Six beautiful passive houses from around the world

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Traditional 1930s Scandinavian Funkis “functionalist style” house was renovated in line with Passive House standards

As green building continues to captivate the architecture industry, ultra-low energy Passive Houses are becoming a common sight.

As green building continues to captivate the architecture industry, ultra-low energy Passive Houses are becoming a common sight. Traditionally popular in Germany, the small ecological footprints and aesthetically pleasing designs of these buildings are now being mimicked in urban and rural settings around the world.

Source Infographic: the 5 principles of Passive Houses: www.passivehouse.com.au
 

We’ve gathered six beautiful examples of modern Passive Houses

New Zealand

In an effort to escape the cold Wanaka winters without incurring high energy costs, the George House was built to provide a heat-tight, energy-efficient environment.

Photography: Simon Devitt / Architect: Rafe Maclean Architects

In an effort to escape the cold Wanaka winters without incurring high energy costs, the George House was built to provide a heat-tight, energy-efficient environment. It is New Zealand’s eighth certified home and the first on its South Island.

Sweden

Villa Circuitus, meaning “a going around” in Latin, is Sweden’s first round Passive House.

Photography: Anders Bergön / Architect: Simone Kreutzer, Tommy Wesslund

Villa Circuitus, meaning “a going around” in Latin, is Sweden’s first round Passive House on two floors. The home is self-sufficient for most of the year, due to the solar panel covered balustrade that surrounds the home’s veranda. For cladding the devlopers chose Kebony Character.
 

Italy

After the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake in Italy’s Abruzzo region, the “Energy Box” Passive House was built inside the remaining walls of a stone house.

Photography: Pierluigi Bonomo / Architect: Pierluigi Bonomo

After the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake in Italy’s Abruzzo region, the “Energy Box” Passive House was built inside the remaining walls of a stone house. The house is protected from future disturbances by its exterior of earthquake-resistant, cross-laminated timber.
 

Norway

This traditional 1930s Scandinavian Funkis “functionalist style” house was renovated in line with Passive House standards and clad in Kebony wood in 2015.

Photography: Lasse Haldrup Juul / Architect: Kontur Architects
 

This traditional 1930s Scandinavian Funkis “functionalist style” house was renovated in line with Passive House standards and clad in Kebony wood in 2015. The wood’s versatility allowed the architect to use excess material to build additional outdoor features, including sustainable plant boxes.
 

South Africa 

This Great Karoo desert home was designed with passive solar principles in mind and allows residents to screen sunlight during warm summer months and capture it during winter months using adjustable shutters.

Photography: Richard Davies, Louis Botha / Architect: Openstudio Architects

This Great Karoo desert home was designed with passive solar principles in mind and allows residents to screen sunlight during warm summer months and capture it during winter months using adjustable shutters. It is placed in an ideal position for viewing star constellations from inside or outdoors. 
 

United States of America

Although Passive Houses are becoming more popular in New York City, only one of these homes is a Passive Certified project in a Landmarked district.

Photography: Peter Peirce / Architect: Baxt Ingui Architects

Although Passive Houses are becoming more popular in New York City, only one of these homes is a Passive Certified project in a Landmarked district. This home in Brooklyn Heights provides a quiet and comfortable escape from city life for its young residents.